Changing Property Values

Individuals may pay more in property tax if the tax rate increases, or if the value of their property increases. Their property tax rate can increase because their taxing district needs to raise revenue in order to provide services. The tax rate may also rise as a result of voter-approved bonds and override levies. If their district’s budget increases while the assessed value of all property remains the same, in most cases the tax rate will rise and they will pay higher taxes.

Even if the tax rate remains the same, individuals’ taxes may rise if their property value increases. Some other factors that will adjust the value upward include the following:

  • Adding a new bathroom
  • Adding a fireplace
  • Adding a terrace
  • Adding an extra room
  • Expanding or adding a garage
  • Finishing the basement

Besides reflecting added features to the home, the property’s value is a part of the economy of the area. Thus, a development of upscale homes nearby can make their property more valuable. If individuals live in a community with rapid growth, and the demand for housing increases, their property’s value will most likely go up.

The opposite is true as well. If the owner’s property is in poor repair or becomes damaged by a fire, earthquake, or flood, or if a major structural problem develops or their neighborhood deteriorates, the assessed value of their home would probably decrease as well. A poor local economy, slow growth, and low demand for homes in their area will probably depress their property’s value.


Inside Changing Property Values